Happy Solar Eclipse Day!

The last total solar eclipse (following a path similar to today’s) occurred on June 8, 1918 which is why so many people are excited to witness this afternoon’s rare astronomical event. Remember to keep yourself and your family safe while viewing. Here are some helpful articles and tips to help you prepare and answer any questions you may have:

  1. Use approved solar eclipse viewers. The only safe way to view a partially eclipsed sun is through special-purpose solar filters, such as “eclipse glasses” or viewers that meet international standard ISO 12312-2 for safe viewing. Sunglasses, smoked glass, unfiltered telescopes or magnifiers, and polarizing filters are unsafe. If you can’t find eclipse viewers, build a pinhole projector to watch the eclipse.
  2. Technique of the pros. Before looking at the sun, cover your eyes with the eclipse viewers while standing still. Glance at the sun, turn away and then remove your filter. Do not remove the filter while looking at the sun.
  3. Totality awesome. Only within the path of totality-and once the moon completely blocks the sun-can eclipse viewers safely be removed to view totality. Once the sun begins reappearing, however, viewers must be replaced.
  4. Visit your doctor of optometry. If you should experience discomfort or vision problems following the eclipse, visit your local doctor of optometry for a comprehensive eye examination.
Katie Van Hise

About Katie Van Hise

Katie Van Hise serves as the Director of Communications and Marketing for the New Jersey Society of Optometric Physicians (NJSOP). She works closely with members of the NJSOP to provide consumers with current and factual information regarding eye and vision care.

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